Irish Poker Boards
Irish Open 2020
Register Arcade FAQ Members List Calendar Mark Forums Read

Go Back   Irish Poker Boards > Poker > General Poker
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 04-10-11, 17:02   #1
Xerxes
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 26
[Taxes] Become a tax resident in Ireland. What to do ?

Hi,

I am a french professional poker player, I have moved in Ireland in August 2010, and I would like to become an irish tax resident in 2011 and up.

I have a lot of difficulties to find answer to my questions. I have found this page : http://www.revenue.ie/en/personal/ci...residence.html but I don't know how to do, because I have no employer.

What kind of paperwork must I fill ? My only income is from my poker winnings. How do other irish poker professional players ? Should I declare myself for "self-employed" http://www.revenue.ie/en/personal/ci...ndividual.html ?

I've send an email to mayo@revenue.ie, but I have not received answer

Thanks to give me advices or links,

Cheers,

Xerxes
Xerxes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-11, 17:48   #2
DeadParrot
Just Resting
 
DeadParrot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 19,803
Hi Xerxes,

In Ireland, no tax is paid on gambling winnings so you do not have to declare anything to my knowledge.
No forms, no paperwork.
__________________
People say I should be more humble I hope they understand, they don't listen when you mumble
Get a shiny metal Revolut card! And a free tenner!
https://revolut.com/referral/jamesb8!G10D21
DeadParrot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-11, 17:57   #3
Bubbleking
Always loved Keano
 
Bubbleking's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 11,141
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xerxes View Post
Hi,

I am a french poker player.........

...........poker winnings.
Bubbleking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-11, 18:11   #4
Keane
Martingale Enthusiast
 
Keane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Under the sea
Posts: 14,025
Send a message via MSN to Keane
Fair play for being so honest!
Keane is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-11, 18:11   #5
CheckRaise
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 608
you have to live here as your primary residence for 3 years
CheckRaise is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-11, 18:51   #6
tipp86
LifeNit
 
tipp86's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 5,280
You can even pick up extra rakeback at your post office once a week.
__________________
Pm for rakeback deals
tipp86 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-11, 19:09   #7
shrapnel
chevauche moi sur le côté, Kylian
 
shrapnel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 7,204
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeadParrot View Post
Hi Xerxes,

In Ireland, no tax is paid on gambling winnings so you do not have to declare anything to my knowledge.
No forms, no paperwork.
the issue is more the legal side of things. if you're a foreigner and come to work here, after 9 months i think, you become a tax resident. the problem with being a poker player is it's difficult to prove you live here as you contribute nothing in tax. you're almost better off getting a part time job for a few months so you are "in the system" so to speak
shrapnel is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-11, 19:17   #8
Xerxes
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeadParrot View Post
Hi Xerxes,

In Ireland, no tax is paid on gambling winnings so you do not have to declare anything to my knowledge.
No forms, no paperwork.
Yeah, the problem with that is when I'll come back in France in 3/4 years, I need proofs that I was irish fiscal resident (even if my taxes was 0 euro). Because I would like be able to come back in France with my poker winnings. If I have no proofs, I must pay a lot of taxes and penalties (something like 80%). With proofs, I will be tax free.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CheckRaise View Post
you have to live here as your primary residence for 3 years
I've read on differents websites (french official and irish official), that I need only to live half year + 1 day (so 183 days) to be able to be irish resident. I live 11 months/year in Ireland, I have electricity bills/internet bill/rent bill, so it doesn't seems to be the major difficulty for me.

So, I really need something to formalize than I live in Ireland and that I "pay" my taxes here. But how ???




Quote:
Originally Posted by tipp86 View Post
You can even pick up extra rakeback at your post office once a week.
Yeah, and bang the post office girl too

Last edited by Xerxes; 04-10-11 at 19:21.
Xerxes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-11, 19:28   #9
Ste05
Member
 
Ste05's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Cogito ergo sum
Posts: 2,999
If no-one can offer you more definitive advice in this thread, I'd suggest searching this website or phoneing them: http://www.citizensinformation.ie/en/

They are excellent everytime I've wanted to know something like this.
Quote:
By Phone: By phoning the Citizens Information Phone Service. Lo Call 1890 777 121 or +353 21 452 1600
Ste05 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-11, 19:30   #10
NewApproach
Member
 
NewApproach's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Below EV
Posts: 5,458
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xerxes View Post
Yeah, and bang the post office girl too
No, that would be rape.
NewApproach is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-11, 19:54   #11
kaiser soze
Member
 
kaiser soze's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 960
She would defo give it up if she knows he is a balla french pokie pro with mirrrions online.
__________________
location green and yellow stretford end
kaiser soze is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-11, 20:00   #12
kincsem
Member
 
kincsem's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 1,197
http://www.revenue.ie/en/tax/it/leaflets/res1.html

Tests of residence

Test 1

The first tax residence test is that an individual is regarded as resident in the State for tax purposes for any tax year in which he or she spends 183 days or more in the State.

Test 2

Where the time spent in the State in a tax year is less than 183 days, then the second test comes into play. The second tax residence test is the 280 days two-year test and involves taking account of an individual’s presence in the State, not alone in one tax year, but also in the preceding tax year. Under this test an individual is regarded as tax resident in the State for tax purposes for any year in which he or she spends a total of 280 days or more in the State in the tax year and in the immediately preceding tax year. However, this test will not apply in any year that an individual is present in the State for not more than 30 days.

.................................................. .................................................. .................................................. ....................................

Option to elect to be tax resident in the State for a tax year

An individual who comes to live or work in the State, and who would not be tax resident for the year of arrival under the normal tests, may elect to be tax resident for the year of arrival.

One reason for electing to be resident is to avail of full personal tax credits (see Leaflet IT1 - Tax Credits, Reliefs & Rates for 2009 and 2010 for a list of available tax credits and reliefs).

A condition of making an election is that you must establish to the satisfaction of an authorised officer of the Revenue Commissioners that you will be resident here in the following tax year under any one of the tests mentioned above. Once such an election is made it cannot subsequently be cancelled.

An election may be made in writing to your local Revenue office.
kincsem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-11, 20:26   #13
Angry-Ball
A rather odd chap
 
Angry-Ball's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: 6 inches into BB Baskin
Posts: 6,635
basically you can go down to the dole office in the morning and sign on,
you don't have to pay taxes on gambling winnings (at least for the moment anyhow)
__________________



"Remember the time he ate my goldfish? And you lied and said I never had goldfish. Then why did I have the bowl, Bart? Why did I have the bowl?"
Angry-Ball is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-11, 22:08   #14
tipp86
LifeNit
 
tipp86's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 5,280
Ye obviously have different girls working in the post office than the post offices that i frequent. Ive never seen someone work in a post office that id consider do-able.


On a serious note your issue is pretty unique. I cant really offer any insight but i vaguely recall a similar thread on the old forum and i think there was a few good suggestions.
__________________
Pm for rakeback deals
tipp86 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-11, 10:32   #15
Lplated
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 936
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ste05 View Post
If no-one can offer you more definitive advice in this thread, I'd suggest searching this website or phoneing them: http://www.citizensinformation.ie/en/

They are excellent everytime I've wanted to know something like this.
This is probably the best advice, the citizens info crowd are usually on the ball.


From what I can remember, you need to declare, immediately, to both the Irish and French Authorities your intention to reside and be a fiscal resident here.

The test they will both apply, based on communal tax treaties, is that you reside here for greater than 183 days out of 365 in one calendar year [not in one tax year] - but they will only begin to calculate that 183 from the point you inform them of your intention to be subject to taxes here.

Things like evidence of renting a property, date of opening a bank account etc... will be help you in establishing your residence.

Into the future, you will have to fill in an annual tax return form [form 11], as a self employed person. Basically you make a return of Zero eligible to be taxed and make a declaration why [ie that your income is not taxable] - the revenue then assess you at zero every year.

When you want to go back to France, or move any of your money back, you get a certificate of compliance from the irish revenue, and that lets you bring your money back to France [or anywhere else in the world] without further tax difficutly.

That aside, the best advice is still to contact that the citizens information crowd, although from experience dealing with Revenue information people can be helpful too. Maybe ring them rather than send email.
Lplated is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-11, 17:21   #16
Xerxes
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 26
Thanks a lot Lplated, it's very useful advices
Xerxes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-11, 22:10   #17
Xerxes
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 26
So, I have had a first answer from http://www.citizensinformation.ie/en/ and it is not seems very clear that poker winnings are tax free :

Quote:
"Hi thank you for your email. We checked with the tax office who state that the income from poker is assessible for tax. You need to get a self assessment tax form and make a return to the revenue. The tax office in Mayo is based in Michael Davitt House Breaffy road Castlebar tel 0949037000."
I will go directly in Castlebar tomorrow, and I will ask my questions to the Tax Office, and I hope good news...
Xerxes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-11, 22:23   #18
Fuzzy Logic
Member
 
Fuzzy Logic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 1,397
No, winnings from poker are not taxable.
Fuzzy Logic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-11, 22:24   #19
Lord Sir Banter
Bantersaurus Rex m8
 
Lord Sir Banter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Having the Bants
Posts: 21,452
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xerxes View Post
So, I have had a first answer from http://www.citizensinformation.ie/en/ and it is not seems very clear that poker winnings are tax free :



I will go directly in Castlebar tomorrow, and I will ask my questions to the Tax Office, and I hope good news...
Ignore them. Whomever said that is incorrect.
You're welcome.
__________________
X can be anything, any number, that is what’s CRAZY about X.
Because X doesn’t roll like that, because X can’t be pinned down!

$ Free Travel Credit with Airbnb $
Lord Sir Banter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-11, 22:27   #20
Fuzzy Logic
Member
 
Fuzzy Logic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 1,397
Quote:
Originally Posted by IrishKestrel
OK - so here's the boring technical answer......

Income from Poker is treated under Capital Gains Tax (25%) legislation, as opposed to Income Tax (41%) legislation.

However, S 613 of the Taxes Consolidation Act 1997 (..told you this would be boring...) covers this off.

"Winnings from betting (including pool betting), lotteries, sweepstakes, or games with prizes shall not be chargeable gains.."

and for those who like to 'stake' people into tourneys

"...and rights to winnings obtained by participating in any pool betting, lottery, sweepstake or game with prizes shall not be chargeable assets."

TRANSLATION: It is tax free income. If it was a good enough excuse for our former Taoiseach to avoid tax problems, your sorted.

Your money in your bank account is as safe as a house / bank / Fianna Fail TD / ?????.
.
Fuzzy Logic is offline   Reply With Quote
Thanks From:
Reply

  Irish Poker Boards > Poker > General Poker

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT. The time now is 13:17.